Current Projects

AMPitup: Adolescent Movement Program

The Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia

Associate Professor Fleur McIntyre, Dr Paola Chivers, Professor Beth Hands,

The Adolescent Movement Program has been running since 2010 as part of a longitudinal research program investigating the impact of movement difficulties on a range of physical, social and emotional health outcomes. The primary focus of the AMPitup program is to determine how best to develop physical fitness and movement skills in adolescents with movement difficulties through exercising in a supportive, fun and non-competitive setting. A long term aim of the program is to develop the skill and confidence in the participants to participate as adults in community-based exercise settings.

AMPitup researchers and trainers have recently been recognised in the media for the contribution they have made in improving the lives of participants. Read more here: ABC Media Story

AMPitup: Bone Density Measures in adolescents with DCD

The Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia & Princess Margaret Hospital Perth.

Professor Beth Hands, Associate Professor Fleur McIntyre, Dr Paola Chivers, Dr Aris Siafarikas, Dr Sophia Nimphius.

This component of the AMPitup program is reporting bone density measures in Adolescents with DCD, evaluating the effect of a 13 week exercise intervention program on bone density measures and then tracking participants longitudinally.

The relationship between motor coordination and mental health in young adults.

Curtin University, The University of Notre Dame Australia, The University of Western Australia

Emeritus Professor Jan Piek, Dr Daniela Rigoli, Professor Beth Hands, Associate Professor Fleur McIntryre, Assistant Professor Melissa Licari.

A growing body of evidence supports the relationship between motor coordination and mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. However, research examining whether these relationships persist or change into early adulthood is currently unclear. This current study aims to examine the relationship between motor coordination, physical activity, and mental health outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety and social support) in young adults.

The Adolescent Motor Competence Questionnaire (AMCQ).

The University of Notre Dame Australia

Dr Amanda Timler, Professor Beth Hands, Associate Professor Fleur McIntryre,

A number of questionnaires exist to examine children, older adolescents and adults perceived level of motor competence.  However, the AMCQ is the first self-report questionnaire developed to assess perceived level of motor competence among adolescents aged between 12 and 18 years.  The AMCQ is a short 26-item questionnaire that shows evidence of validity and reliability.  It has also been culturally adapted to be used in the Netherlands and Brazil.

Exploring how difficulty levels affect outcomes in children’s performance while imagining and performing actions

The University of Notre Dame Australia

Ranila Bhoyroo, Professor Beth Hands, Dr Adam Wigley,

Some children have difficulties imagining and performing actions. Their performance appears to be affected by the difficulty or complexity of the task and the child’s motor competence. This study aims to look at how boys aged 8-12 years with and without poor motor coordination plan and imagine four fun motor tasks.

From the mouth of a small boy…..

A small boy was being assessed for movement issues.  One task was to walk heel-toe along a line.

As he struggled to complete the task he said “My feet are playing a trick on me”

Recruiting 8-12 year old boys

The study aims to look at how boys with and without poor motor coordination plan and imagine four fun motor tasks.

To participate you have to come to The University of Notre Dame for 2 sessions.

Session 1: Participants will undergo a motor assessment.

Session 2: Participants will perform simple activities that involve thinking and moving small objects.

For more information please refer to the Participation Information Sheet

Recruiting adults aged 25-40 years

This study  is being conducted by the WA Bone Research Collaboration (WABRC) to get a snap shot of bone health in healthy adults with and without poor movement coordination in WA .

There are two stages in this study.  You can participate in Stage 1 only, or you can participate in both Stages.

Stage 1:  anonymous online survey. You can then choose to participate in Stage 2 if you want.

Stage 2:  Two bone scans at the Exercise Medicine Research Institute at Edith Cowan University in Joondalup. This is free.

For more information please refer to the Participation Information Sheet available online via the study survey link.

Click  the link to read more and if you are still interested begin the online survey for Stage 1 of the study.

Anonymous Adult Bone Health Study Survey Link